Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.

Click for information on Amazon.com about this book.

other books
about using Word

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.

Click for information on Amazon.com about this book.

other books
about using Word

 

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

 

Automated "Boilerplate"

Autotext and AutoCorrect in Microsoft Word - including Building Blocks

by Charles Kyle Kenyon, Esq.

This page last edited Wednesday 09 July 2014 - still a draft

Note: "Boilerplate" is a term of art used in the legal framework meaning standardized text.

There are no promises that this chapter is of the same quality and depth as the other chapters of this guide. That is because it was written by a single author not working with Microsoft. You will not find this chapter on the Microsoft site. AutoText is a one form of Building Blocks in ribbon versions of Word. Virtually everything said about AutoText here applies to Building Blocks.

Comments are welcome.

What You Will Learn

After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
bulletUse and organize AutoText (Building Blocks) entries
bulletUse Built-In ShortCut Keys to Insert or Save AutoText (Building Blocks)
bulletAssign ShortCut Keys to AutoText Entries
bulletCreate a custom menu to hold your AutoText entries
bulletUse a macro to insert AutoText entries from a global or document template.
bulletUse AutoCorrect
bulletSet your AutoCorrect Options
bulletUse AutoCorrect to insert boilerplate
bulletUse AutoCorrect to insert fractions (instead of AutoCorrect As You Type)
bulletUse AutoCorrect to add paragraph borders between paragraphs
bulletUse AutoCorrect to add random or dummy text to a document. (Rand and Lorem functions)
bulletUse AutoCorrect entries to not only correct your typing but also to insert boilerplate.
bulletSwitch AutoCorrect on and off.
bulletSwitch AutoFormat As You Type on and (mostly) off.
bulletBack-Up your AutoCorrect entries
bulletKnow where AutoText and AutoCorrect entries are stored on your computer and move AutoText entries from template to template and AutoCorrect entries from one computer to another.
bulletKnow where Building Blocks can be stored. 
bulletBe able to print out your AutoText entries or AutoCorrect entries
bulletTroubleshoot problems with AutoText, AutoFormat as you type, and AutoCorrect

Additional Written (and Web) Resources

bullet Word for Law Firms and Lawyers
bullet Word 97 for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bullet Word 2000 for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bullet Word X (2002) for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bullet Word 2003 for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bullet

The Lawyer's Guide to Microsoft Word 2007 by Ben M. Schorr

bullet

The Lawyer's Guide to Microsoft Word 2010 by Ben M. Schorr

bullet

Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010 for Law Professionals Unveiling the Rules and Secrets of Legal Word Processing by Patricia Gordon and KAS Training

bulletother books about using Word


bulletAutoText Sampler - tutorial showing Autotext use in dropdowns and menus
bullet Gender Toolbar template - download this global template for an example of AutoText used to insert fields from a complex menu.
bullet What is AutoText and How Do I Use It? by Cindy Meister, MVP, Beth Melton, MVP, and Jay Freedman, MVP - includes information on Building Blocks
bullet How to Add Pop-Up Lists to Any Word Document So You Can Click Your Way Through Changes in Seconds (or how to use the AutoTextList field) by Bill Coan, MVP.
bullet AutoText Inserter Code Sampler - template with sample code to insert AutoText from a global (or document) template
bulletLetterhead Textboxes and Styles Tutorial - two-page template download that demonstrates use of  the AutoText list field restricted by styles for the salutation and closing.
bullet How can I import and export all my AutoCorrect entries, so they can be transferred to another machine? Also see correction by Dave Rado to AutoCorrect utility that comes with Word. This page has a downloadable utility that lets you see and edit all of you AutoCorrect entries in a Word table. You can then use the utility and table to move/copy your entries to a different computer.
bullet How to Move (Copy) AutoCorrect Entries from One Computer to Another in Word 2007 (2010)
bullet Exploiting AutoCorrect by Suzanne Barnhill, MVP
bullet Word 2007 & Later Key Data File Location by Paul Edstein and Charles Kenyon
bulletInsert a selection of documents by Graham Mayor, MVP - Add-In to insert documents
bullet Autocorrect in Word (Office) 2010 - Microsoft
bulletMicrosoft Knowledge Base:Turning Off Autocorrect Features (Q212339), FileName field doesn't update in Word 2002 or later. (Q832897), AutoCorrect Text Deleted or Partially Visible in Form Field (Q212394)
bullet What Just Happened? Changes Word 97/2000 Makes As You Type (Microsoft)
bulletTaming AutoFormat as you Type: Word is always making changes I don't expect. How can I get more control over my formatting? by Suzanne S. Barnhill, MVP, and Dave Rado, MVP.

 

bulletBuilding Blocks in Word 2007 and later
bullet
Word 2007 Building Blocks & Autotext by Greg Maxey - walks you through the concept of galleries for building blocks - how to create and organize them - including ways that Microsoft may not have conceived! Includes downloadable enhancements.
bulletChapters 13-15 of Herb Tyson's Microsoft Word 2010 Bible - Building Blocks, AutoCorrect and Autoformat in Word 2010 (and 2007)
bulletWord 2007-2013 Building Blocks: Part I, Inserting and Swapping, Creating
bullet Providing Helpful Tips for Easy AutoText Entry - Autocomplete
bullet Replacing All Building Blocks
bullet Adding an AutoText Entry
bullet Deleting an AutoText Entry
bullet Working more efficiently with Word 2007's new building blocks
bullet Create and use content Building Blocks in Word 2007 documents
bullet Create and distribute boilerplate text - Word 2007
bullet Building Document Generation Systems from Templates with Word 2010 and Word 2007
bullet Create and use content Building Blocks in Word 2007(-2013) documents by Katherine Murray, Mary Milhollin, and Beth Melton. Excerpt from Microsoft Word 2007 Inside Out.
bulletMicrosystems white paper on Building Blocks
bullet Missing Page Number / Header / Footer Commands - greyed out - Charles Kenyon

 

Boilerplate Macro Package (Commercial Add Ins)

bullet BoilerPlate Add-In for Word by Bill Coan, MVP
bullet AutoText Manager by Chris Devrell

 

Click to return to table of contents page of Legal Users' Guide to Microsoft Word.Click to go to Microsoft Word new users frequently asked questions site in a new browser window.
(this guide table of contents) ------- (MS Word New Users FAQ)

When I started using computer word processing the way to repeat text was with macros (even on paper tape!). I learned to write very lengthy and complex macros in Word Perfect. Macros are still useful in Word, but repeating boilerplate text is not a good use for them. Word has AutoText and AutoCorrect that do a much better job and are more easily edited.

Distinguishing Among AutoText, AutoFormat and AutoCorrect (Overview and definitions)

There are three "Auto" functions that are easily confused and work in similar ways when you are creating documents. Those are AutoText, AutoFormat, and AutoCorrect.

AutoFormat and the related AutoFormat as you type are not useful for preparing boilerplate and may be discussed in depth elsewhere. You can turn functions on and off but you can't customize them. They don't insert text but can change how it looks dramatically.

Both AutoText and AutoCorrect allow the user to pick text to be inserted. Both come with predefined replacements. They are stored in different places and are edited or transferred in different ways. Both can insert and replace text but they act and show up on your screen in different ways.

AutoCorrect does what it name implies - fixes errors. It can do much more, though. It checks each "word" as you type by looking that "word" up in a database of corrections. Points to keep in mind:

bulletBecause such errors and corrections are unique to each language, AutoCorrect is specific to each language, with different files for different languages if you are using more than one.
bulletIt will change "hte" to "the" or "additinal" to "additional."
bulletIt will also change "(c)" to the copyright symbol or ":)" to a smiley face.
bulletYou can add your own entries to this replacement table and they can be quite lengthy. "pfp" can be replaced with "Party of the First Part."
bulletTo Word a "word" is at least two characters that is followed by a space or punctuation or the Enter key. Those characters can include punctuation marks and numbers.
bullet Limits on AutoCorrect include a maximum size for an unformatted entry of 255 characters and a maximum size of the trigger entry of 31 characters.
bulletUnformatted AutoCorrect entries (most of them) are available in (shared with) all Microsoft Office programs. Formatted AutoCorrect entries and AutoText/Building Blocks are available only in Word.

The advantage of AutoCorrect is that it corrects errors in real time rather than coming back for correction later. A very real disadvantage is that what Microsoft considers an error may be a word you intend to use. If you use Google to search for "AutoCorrect fun" or "AutoCorrect errors" you'll likely find some entertaining examples. In Word, the most likely source of problems is checking the box at the bottom of the option to automatically use suggestions from the Spelling Checker.

AutoCorrect Options word 2010

Those suggestions will often be right, but when they are not, Word makes the substitution without telling you!

AutoText may be more suited to your purpose

For boilerplate, AutoText is usually superior to AutoCorrect because it is more easily edited and transferred from computer to computer, and any size limitation is related to storage space. AutoText resides in templates, rather than in a special file.

AutoText tooltipIf your AutoText is stored in your Normal.dotm template in Word 2010 it gives you a "tooltip" showing what the replacement text will be before it makes the replacement. (In versions earlier than Word 2007 it shows this tooltip regardless of where the AutoText is stored.) The tooltip shown here is for the AutoText entry named "ATEntry1" and the contents are "This is an AutoText entry tooltip." It is shown after the first four letters of the name: "aten." Note that this is not case-sensitive. In Word 2007 there are no tooltips for AutoText entries.

With AutoText if you type the first four letters of your AutoText entry name you'll see a tooltip showing the entire entry (or its start). If you press Enter when the tooltip is showing, you'll get your replacement entry. Especially in Word 2007-2013, if the tooltip is not showing but you've typed the first four letters, try pressing the F3 key. Note, if the first four letters are not unique to one AutoText entry, you'll need to type enough to have a unique entry name. You can also attach a keyboard shortcut to your AutoText entries, but that seems overkill.

Either way you use AutoText you will probably find it useful. Continue using it and you will develop a whole library of boilerplate. In WordPerfect this function was filled with macros; in Word it is AutoText. While Word uses macros, they fulfill a different purpose.

Where Are They?

AutoText is kept in templates. It is stored in the normal template by default but is often better kept in a document template or in a different global template. In Ribbon versions of Word (2007-2013) it is still stored in templates, but is a part of the concept "Building Blocks." In Word 2007-2013 Building Blocks including AutoText entries are stored by default in a separate building blocks file but can be stored in other templates, including normal.dotm. In Word 2007 the name of the default building blocks file is "Building Blocks.dotx." In Word 2010-2013 the name is "Built-In Building Blocks.dotx." These files are stored in a sub folder of the User's Application Data folder. The precise folder depends on both the version of word and the operating system. These are hidden system folders.

Windows XP Location:
c:\Documents and Settings\{your username}\Application Data\Microsoft\Document Building Blocks\1033\

Windows Vista & 7-8 Location:
c:\Users\{your username}\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Document Building Blocks\1033\

The 1033 is the English-language version. Within that folder there may be additional folders for the version of Word. Again, that is the location for the default storage location. Any template stored in the Document Building Blocks folder will share building blocks with all files. If put in a subfolder, it should share the restrictions of that subfolder. That is, if the template is placed in the 1033 folder and the user is using a non-English language proofing set, the template may not be available, while if it were in the general Building Blocks folder (one level up) it would be available.

Building blocks including AutoText (Word 2007-2013) must be stored in templates. In Ribbon versions of Word, they can be stored in either dotx or dotm templates. For the template to have macros, it must be a dotm template and cannot be stored in the Building Blocks folder if you want access to the macros. Templates to hold building blocks may be stored in the Document Building Blocks folder. They need not be stored in the same language- or version-specific folder as the built-in building blocks file. They can be stored in that folder and if they are, should carry the language restrictions of that containing folder.

Saving AutoText

In order to save anything as AutoText (including textboxes), what you want to save must be selected. The quick way is to press Alt+F3. When you use Alt+F3 to save something as AutoText (or another type of Building Block) Word gives you a dialog box to let you assign a name to the AutoText entry. The default name is the actual text, but something else may be a better name. In Word 2007 and later that dialog gives you options for where the AutoText is to be stored, again, in the normal template by default. You can tell Word to save the selection in a different Building Blocks Gallery and assign a category.

 

In earlier versions (non-Ribbon) Alt+F3 does not give storage options and you will be saving in normal.dot.

 

Instead, with the text you want to save selected, you need to go to AutoText under the Insert Menu and pick the general AutoText at the top. This will give you the following dialog from the AutoCorrect Options for AutoText:

 

The options you will have for storage locations for AutoText include the default normal template, the attached document template if that is different, and loaded Add-In templates that already have AutoText. The currently open document is not an option because documents cannot hold AutoText or other Building Blocks.

 

AutoCorrect is mostly kept in separate .acl files. Formatted AutoCorrect entries, though are stored in Normal.dot. (Normal.dotm in Word 2007-2013)  More.

AutoFormat is built into Word and switched on or off with options settings. See Tame AutoFormat.

Assign Your AutoText Entries to a Key or Key Combination

The following is taken from my response to someone on a newsgroup who wanted to assign keystrokes to superscripted numbers 1-4. She had asked to replace four of the symbols over the numbers on the keyboard with these and had been told by another (knowledgeable) user that this was not a good idea.

Start Word. If you are already in Word, exit and restart it. Then, type five words in a new document. If you will only be using these in documents based upon a particular template, base your document on that template. If you want to be able to share these with someone else or move them to a different computer, you do not want to store them in Normal.dot. See Template Basics information on Global templates.

Then insert the four superscripted numbers as if they were footnote references (that you were manually typing in rather than inserting footnotes). Then, in turn, select each of the superscripted characters and save them as AutoText entries named spr1, spr2, spr3 and spr4. (Insert => AutoText => AutoText) Make sure that the AutoText entries are being saved in the proper template if you are basing your documents on a special template. Then select the fifth word and assign it to autotext as spr5.

Once you have the AutoText entries, you are ready to assign them to keys. The method we will use will replace only one of your keyboard's built-in key assignments for all five of the AutoText entries.

(Word 97-2003) Tools => Customize => Keyboard (button)

  1. Make sure that you are saving in the proper template. Again, if this is for sharing or you want to be able to move it from computer to computer, you want to save these settings in a template other than Normal.dot.
  2. In the window on the left (categories), scroll down until you find AutoText.
  3. Select that and find "spr1" in the AutoText list on the right. 
  4. Click in the input window that says "Press new shortcut key" and holding down the Alt key press the letter S. The window will show "Alt + S." (This picture shows "Alt+A.")
  5. Underneath, Word will show you if this has been assigned to anything else. (On my system, it comes up with [prefix] indicating that our use may not interfere with whatever other uses the key has, because we will be using it as a prefix key as well.) Next press the 1 key. The window should now show "Alt + S, 1." Underneath it should say [unassigned]. 
  6. Click on the Assign button. 

Next repeat this process for your other four AutoText entries, typing the appropriate number for each. Then click on the close button and close the customize dialog box as well.

Test your keys out.

First press Alt+S. Nothing will seem to happen. Then type a 1. It will be superscripted. Type something else immediately after the 1. That should not be superscripted. Test each of your numbers. Finally, test it using the number 5. We put in this last entry so that you could see that it is indeed using your AutoText, not just altering the numbers that we happened to use as trigger keys.

If you want, you can now go back into the AutoText dialog box and delete spr5. It has served its purpose.

You could assign these autotext entries to any keystroke or keystroke combination (including the keys you originally requested). You should be very careful, though, about replacing key bindings because it can be very tricky to figure out what is going on when you forget about them (or if someone else tries to use your computer). You may have noted that you could use the Customize Keyboard dialog to assign not only AutoText but macros, styles, fonts, or any Word command to a key.

You might want to copy these instructions to a text file called something like "Word key assignments.txt" and keep it, with any notes you care to make, so that you can backtrack later.

 

AutoText Keyboard Shortcuts Built into Word

There are two built-in keyboard shortcuts: F3 and Alt+F3.

F3 looks in the AutoText available for something that matches what you just typed and inserts it. If a tooltip for the entry is showing, you can press Enter or F3 to use your AutoText. If no tooltip is showing you need to use the F3 key.

Alt+F3 tells Word that you want your selected text to be boilerplate. It will display a short dialog box allowing you to name the entry and (in Word 2007-2013) designate a storage location. Here are the dialog boxes for Word 97-2003 and Word 2007-2010 respectively:

AutoText create Word 2003 

Remember that this (Alt+F3) is a shortcut method of adding an entry. You can also use the longer dialog boxes. In the earlier versions of Word this is the only way to designate a template other than normal.dot as the storage container.

Create a Custom Menu to hold your AutoText Entries (Word 97-2003)*

There are (at least) two ways to do this, neither of which involve macros or VBA. The first method requires use of styles in both the creation and implementation of the AutoText entries. The second method require using the Customize... dialog under the Tools menu to create your menu. Once created, this menu works like any other Word menu. Both methods are demonstrated by the AutoText Sampler download. Both methods are intended for creation of a menu in a document template or global template; they will be used in your documents and templates. A custom Word menu is demonstrated in the Gender Toolbar template which has numerous fields saved as AutoText entries that are accessible from a custom menu.

Use the AutoText Entries drop down box (built-in field) in your text as a field

This method involves use of Paragraph styles in both the creation and use of the AutoText. Unless a paragraph mark is a part of the AutoText entry, the style in which the entry is created will have no effect on the formatting of the inserted text. It will, however, change the category under which the entry is classified by Word.

Creating your AutoText Entries so they will be placed in a category by Word.

To create the entries for your list, type them in a document where they would normally be used. This document should be based on a template other than Normal.dot. Then select a potential grouping of text that you want to fit into a particular category. For this exercise, be sure that the text does not include a paragraph mark. Go to the Format menu and select Style... 

A dialog box will pop up with your current style selected. Unless you have already created a style for this kind of entry, click on the New button. This will pop up another dialog box for the creation of a new style. Give your new style a name, i.e., "z Interrogatories - AutoText." The "z" is in the name to put it at the end of most Styles lists; the "AutoText" tag is to indicate the style's function.

Warning WARNING: The AutoText categories are based on Paragraph styles - not Character styles. The type of style you are creating will show up in the top right corner of the New Style dialog box. If it says "character," change it to "paragraph."

Click on OK to close the New Style dialog box. Note that we didn't make any changes to the style, nor did we check the box about saving it to the template, we just gave it a name. That name will become the AutoText category for entries of this type. Click on the Apply button so that your current entry will be formatted using this style.

Then call up the AutoText dialog box. 

Tools menu -> AutoCorrect -> AutoText (tab)

Change the box at the bottom so that it says: Look In: your template's name. What you want here is the name of the template on which your document is based, not "All available templates," or "Normal.dot."

Click on the Add button to add your entry. Choose a name for your entry so that it will be clearly identifiable when you use it. (i.e., pid Expert - treating physician

Tip Tip: Use a naming convention for your AutoText entries that will group the entries together by their intended use. We have already made the major cut. Our style name tells us that this entry is for use as an interrogatory. In the suggested name above, the "pid" stands for personal injury defense and the "Expert - treating physician" gives us the subject of the interrogatory. Other names might be "pid Expert - other care provider" and "pid Expert - Accident Reconstruction." This way, all interrogatories relating to expert witnesses in personal injury cases where the firm represents the defendant will be grouped together in your category list.
Tip Tip: Make sure that the starting part of the name is not a real word (or if four or more letters, the start of a real word that you are likely to type). Otherwise, you may end up inserting your AutoText entry in unexpected places!
Tip Tip: If you need to include multiple paragraphs in an AutoText entry, you can create styles that are used only to categorize AutoText entries and use your ordinary styles to hold your content. Word picks the category from the first style in an AutoText entry. If you format your naming styles as 1 pt. white hidden text, you should be able to use a paragraph in that style at the beginning of your AutoText entry without disrupting your documents much. I would suggest putting the following text in that paragraph: THIS IS AN AUTOTEXT NAMING PARAGRAPH AND MAY BE DELETED.

Then select the other text that you want to use for entries, one word, sentence or paragraph (without the paragraph mark) at a time. Change the paragraph style of each paragraph to that of your category style and add the autotext entry, each time checking to make sure that it is being saved in your template.

At this point, close your document, without saving the changes to the document but saving changes to the attached template. You are now ready to create a drop down AutoText list based on the entries you just made.

You can include paragraph marks in your AutoText entries but if you do this, your text in that paragraph will maintain its style. If the style already exists in the document, it will use the style definition already in place. If the style does not exist, it will be imported. See the IncludeText field tutorial for examples of the sorts of result you will get.

Creating the drop-down AutoText list

Use File -> New and create a new template based on the template to which you just added the AutoText. (Click radio button for "New Template" instead of "New Document" in the bottom-right corner of the dialog box.)

(more to be written here) 

The text in teal which which follows is from the Word 2000 help screen on inserting a drop down field for AutoText:

  1. On the Insert menu, click Field.
  2. Under Categories, click Links and references.
  3. Under Field names, click AUTOTEXTLIST.
  4. Click after the field name in the Field codes box, and then type the text that you want to appear on the screen within quotation marks  for example, "Recipient List".

 

bulletTo display AutoText entries formatted with a style different from the one applied to the field code, click Options in the Field dialog box, click the Field Specific Switches tab, and then click \s under Switches. Click Add to field, click in the Field codes box, and then type the name of the style within quotation marks.
bulletWhen the user's mouse pointer rests on the field and ScreenTips are on, a tip tells the user how to display the list of AutoText entries. To change the ScreenTip text, click Options in the Field dialog box, click the Field Specific Switches tab, and then click \t under Switches. Click Add to field, click in the Field codes box, and then type the text that you want to appear in the ScreenTip within quotation marks.

See also How to add pop-up lists to any Word document, so you can click your way through changes in seconds by Bill Coan, MVP.

* For Word 2007-2010 an easier way to categorize AutoText may be to put it in separate custom galleries. See Greg Maxey's site for more on this.

Build your own custom menu(s) of AutoText entries by creating a toolbar

AutoText custom toolbar. Click for larger image of a custom toolbar. Here's how, in eight easy steps. 

First, I would recommend creating a new template to hold your AutoText and your toolbars. Then copy your AutoText entries to that template using the Organizer.

(Tools | AutoCorrect | AutoText (Tab) | Organizer (Button))

Second, use the Tools | Customize... command. Make sure that the template in which the customizations are to be stored is the template you want.

Third, create a new custom toolbar to hold your menu(s). This is done under the Toolbars tab of the Customize dialog box.

Fourth, click on the second tab (commands) and scroll all the way to the bottom of the list on the left. You will find "New Menu." Select "New Menu" from the list on the _right_ (it's the only thing on that list) and drag it to your new toolbar. Right-click on it and change the name to whatever you want it to be.

Fifth, one of the other categories of commands which can be added to a menu is "AutoText." Click on that (left box) and then drag the autotext entries you want to use (right box) onto your menu.

Sixth, once you have your menu(s) on your custom toolbar, close the Customize dialog box and save your template.

Seventh, open the Customize dialog box again if you want your menu to appear under the Tools or Insert (or any other  built-in) menu. Holding the Cntrl key down, drag your menu to the built-in menu you want to use. Close the dialog and save again.

Eighth, save your template as a global. There are a number of ways to do this. Those ways and more on templates can be found at: http://www.addbalance.com/usersguide/templates.htm.

It is important to build the custom toolbar and to keep the custom menus on that toolbar even if they are going to be used in the built-in menus. This is because you can use the Organizer to copy custom toolbars but not to move customizations of the built-in menus. If you ever do move this toolbar to another template, be sure to move the autotext entries first.

See Moving / Copying / Sharing customizations for information on putting toolbars like this in a global template so that they are available in all of your documents.

Note, beginning with Word 2007, a better method would be to create a custom Building Blocks Gallery to share your AutoText. See Building Blocks & AutoText for more on this. The templates for this can be stored in the Word Startup Folder, the Office Startup folder, or the Building Blocks folder. If they contain QAT modifications to access the gallery, though, they must be stored in one of the Startup folders.

Moving/Copying AutoText Entries

Using the Organizer to Copy AutoText

You can copy AutoText between templates. One of the most effective ways to do this is through the Organizer. The Organizer is a tool built into Word that allows you to quickly copy Styles, AutoText, Toolbars and Macros. In Word 97-2003, you can access the Organizer in one of three ways:

Tools => AutoCorrect => AutoText (tab) => Organizer (button)

Format => Style... => Organizer (button)

Tools => Templates and Add-Ins... => Organizer (button)

from the Format menu, choose Style and click Organizer; or from the Tools menu, choose Templates and Add-Ins and click Organizer. This gets you the following dialog box which controls AutoText, Styles, Toolbars and Macros:

AutoText Organizer Word 97-2003

In Word 2007 - Word 2013 You can use the Building Blocks Organizer found under the Quick Parts drop-down on the Insert tab.

Instead, for Word 2007 - 2013, I recommend using Greg Maxey's free Add-In that gives you the following dialog box for all of your building blocks. Like the original Organizer, it allows copying and manipulation of multiple entries at the same time. The Building Blocks Organizer that comes with Word lets you work on one entry at a time when trying to move entries from template to template. If you use the link above, you'll find the download at the bottom of a page explaining the features.

AutoText Building Blocks Organizer Microsoft Word

 

Practice: Copy AutoText Using the Organizer
  1. Word 97-2003 From the Tools menu, choose Templates and Add-Ins.
  2. Click Organizer.

 

  1. Word 2007-2013 call up Greg Maxey's Enhanced Building Blocks Organizer from the Insert tab
  2. It is under the Document Parts drop-down. (You have to download his free Add-In to use this. Otherwise the drop-down will say Quick Parts and you will be trying to use the inferior Building Blocks Organizer.)

 

  1. Select the appropriate tab for items that you want to copy. For example, to copy AutoText from one template to another select the AutoText tab.
  2. To copy AutoText from your current attached template to the Normal.dot template which makes the AutoText available each time you start Word, select the AutoText and click Copy. (Note: It is recommended that you store your AutoText entries in either an attached template or a global template other than Normal.dot.) If your current attached template is Normal.dot, both windows will show Normal.dot. Close at least one of these templates!
  3. To switch to a different template click on the Close File button under the window you want to use for that template. Then click the same button again (except this time it will say Open File) and pick a template file from which (/ to which) you want to copy your AutoText.
  4. Generally, you do not want to have two AutoText entries with the same name available to your document at the same time. This means that if you are copying from Normal.dot to another global template, after you save that template with the changes, you will want to delete the AutoText entries from Normal.dot. If you have an AutoText entry with the same name in your document's attached template as one in a global template, Word will use the one in the attached template.
  5. Click Close.

Note: The above section on using the Organizer was based on the similar section in the Styles chapter.

In Word 2010 there can be advantages to storing AutoText in normal.dotm in that you can use the tooltip feature. I like to maintain a backup copy of normal.dotm when I do this. That is a good idea anyway. (The tooltip feature is not available in Word 2007; in Word 2013, it is available for any AutoText stored in the attached template or in loaded global templates, but not that stored in the Building Blocks folder.)

Where Can Building Blocks Be Stored? (Word 2007-2013)

bulletName Choice

When you create a new building block, you can choose a name. The default will be the beginning text in the selection, if there is text. This is seldom what you want. You do want a unique name, a descriptive name. Further, you want a name that is unique in a very few characters. (Word needs a unique series of characters before it knows to insert.) See Category Choice below for more.

bulletGallery Choice

When you store a Building Block you can choose a Gallery. The Word 2003 WordArt Add-In using Custom Gallery 4. If you are storing text for use in the body of a document you probably want to use the AutoText Gallery. For a Header, you would use the Header Gallery; for a Footer, the Footer Gallery; for a Cover Page, the Cover Page Gallery.

bulletCategory Choice

Category is a heading that can be used for sorting building blocks in the building blocks organizer. When a Building Blocks Gallery is displayed (Cover Pages, Watermarks, Textboxes) the entries are sorted first by category (in alphabetical order) and then by alphabetical order. If you want your entry to appear at the top of the list, you want it in the category that is first in alphabetical order, and to have a name that will place it first. People will often use an underscore to start a name: _MyAT, _MyCoverPage, _Watermark3, etc.

Building blocks must be stored in templates; their are four choices:

bulletThe Building Blocks File

By default, building blocks will be stored in your building blocks file. The name of that file depends on your version of Word. In Word 2007 this file is "Building Blocks.dotx." In Word 2010-2013 this file is Built-In Building Blocks.dotx.

This file is not the place for building blocks that you want to share with others.

In the English language version of Word these files are in

Windows XP Location:
c:\Documents and Settings\{your username}\Application Data\Microsoft\Document Building Blocks\1033\

Windows Vista & 7 Location:
c:\Users\{your username}\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Document Building Blocks\1033\

This is a hidden system folder. If your Start menu has a search function searching for %APPDATA% will lead you toward the folder.

bulletYour Normal.dotm file

This is the place of choice for personal AutoText in Word 2010 since AutoComplete can be used for AutoText entries stored in normal.dotm in Word 2010. (Autocomplete does not work in Word 2007 at all. In Word 2013 it works for AT entries stored in other templates.) AutoComplete is only for AutoText building blocks.

This is not the place for building blocks that you want to share with others.

bulletA global template

Stored in either the Word Startup Folder or in the appropriate building blocks folder. If you want, you can set up QAT shortcuts to your building blocks in such a template if it is to be stored in the Startup folder. Unless the template is to hold macros or other customizations, it can be a .dotx file and in the building blocks folder. If it contains macros, in will need to be in a "trusted location;" the Word Startup Folder should be a trusted location.

bulletA document template

If the building blocks are for use with a particular template, they might as well be stored in that template directly. Again, unless the template is to contain macros, it can be a .dotx template. Building Blocks, like AutoText, cannot be stored in regular documents.

For an example of a building blocks template that acts as an Add-In see the Word 2003 WordArt Building Blocks Add-In.

See Saving AutoText above for more on the use of the Alt+F3 keyboard shortcut.

See also Moving / Copying Customizations (including AutoText) to another template.
 

Using macros to insert AutoText from a global or document template

Recorded macros don't work for this and they are not portable. See the Knowledge Base article on this. You can download a template with concise portable code from the Word FAQ downloads page.

AutoCorrect

AutoCorrect is sometimes confused with AutoText but the two are very different. A key distinction is that unformatted AutoCorrect entries are shared by all Office programs. AutoText and Building Blocks are Word components only. A second distinction is that AutoText is stored in templates, while AutoCorrect is (mostly) stored in language-specific ACL files. The key to using AutoCorrect is the AutoCorrect Option settings.

AutoCorrect Options

In Word 97-2003 you access the AutoCorrect options dialog under the Tools menu. In Word 2007 -2010 you get to it from the Options. This is listed as Word Options under the Office Button in Word 2007 and under the File Tab in Word 2010.

AutoCorrect Options microsoft word

Word 2010 AutoCorrect Options Dialog

(tabs different in earlier versions)

A quick way to get to AutoCorrect Options in Word 2007-2013 is to click on the lightning bolt drop down after an AutoCorrect. This is shown to the right. Word just corrected "hte" to "The" at the beginning of a sentence. Bringing the mouse pointer over the word displays the lightning bolt and after a few seconds the tooltip. Clicking on the lightning bolt brings up the AutoCorrect Options Dialog.

Using AutoCorrect to Correct typos

I suspect this is the original purpose behind AutoCorrect and the reason for the name. If you type "adn" and press the space bar, Word changes this to "and." When you type "adequit" followed by a period, Word changes it to "adequate" followed by the period. Like all AutoCorrect text replacements (other than the functions shown below) these are set forth in the table of AutoCorrect replacements.

Again, these are language-specific. AutoCorrect, though, can be used for much more than correcting typos. Two uses are insertion of boilerplate text quickly, and automatic insertion of formatted fractions.

Using AutoCorrect for quickly typing boilerplate text

Say the name of your company is "International WireWorks, Inc." and you have to type that 40 times a day. You could select the name and save it (without the period at the end) as an AutoCorrect entry with the trigger being "iww." Whenever you type "iww." in your documents, you will get "International WireWorks, Inc." Note, if you had included the period in your saved text, you would have two periods in your resulting text. The same can be done with much more extensive phrases.

Using AutoCorrect to type formatted fractions

AutoFormat as You Type already provides limited insertion of fractions. These are limited to the fractions built into the font being used. If you have the option for this checked, Word will replace typed common fractions like 1/2 and 1/3 with the font characters for those. (This option is checked by default in a Word installation.)

However many fractions (i.e. 2/3, 1/16) are not included in fonts. If you want to have more fractions handled automatically and have them appear with consistent formatting in your documents, you could create formatted AutoCorrect entries with the numerator formatted as superscript and the numerator formatted as subscript. You would also uncheck the "Fractions" option on the AutoFormat as You Type option.

Since these are formatted entries, they are stored in the normal template, not in the language-specific acl file. For more on this, see How Can I Create a Fraction in Word that isn't in Any of the Fonts that I Have? For a macro solution see Create a Fraction by Graham Mayor.

 

Using AutoFormat as you Type to insert paragraph borders (fancy lines)

It's easy to add a variety of horizontal divider lines to Word documents. To create a solid, black line for example, type three HYPHENS (-) at the beginning of a new paragraph and then press ENTER. Typing three UNDERSCORES (_) will make a thicker line, and so on. (If you type more than three, it will still work.) 

See the table below for a guide to the types of lines you can create:

TO CREATE A LINE LIKE THIS TYPE THIS AND PRESS ENTER
--- (Three HYPHENS)
___ (Three UNDERSCORES)
=== (Three EQUAL SIGNS)
### (Three POUND SIGNS)
*** (Three ASTERISKS)
~~~ (Three TILDES)


If you're having trouble making this tip work, try this:

  1. Select AutoCorrect from the Tools menu.
  2. Click the AutoFormat As You Type tab.
  3. Then select the Borders check box under the Apply as you type heading.

Note: These can be very disconcerting if you don't know that this is what is happening. For that reason, many experienced Word users, including your author, turn this option off. If you want to not apply these (or any other AutoFormat or AutoCorrect) press Ctrl+Z immediately after Word makes the change. You can also add a space after your three (or more) characters and Word will not convert the characters to a paragraph border. If you are past the point where Ctrl+Z will help, you can get rid of one of these borders by removing the border format from the paragraph.

In Word 97-2003, place your cursor in the text line above the border and use Format => Borders and Shading. Make sure that the apply to box says "paragraph" and click on the box for "none."

AutoFormat as you type correction - AutoText autocorrect microsoft wordIn Word 2007-2010, place your cursor in the text line above the border and on the Home tab find the Borders and Shading dropdown in the paragraph group; it will be highlighted (shown left). Select No Border.

 

Using AutoCorrect to Insert Random Text - Rand and Lorem functions

There is in AutoCorrect a function to insert random or filler text to help you see how a template will look when it is used. In Word 2000-2003 this is the Rand function. Later versions also have the Lorem function. Both use AutoCorrect but allow the user to specify the amount of text. Both require that they begin a paragraph and both are triggered by the Enter key at the end of the paragraph.

Here are the two functions before the enter key is pressed:

=rand(5)

=rand(5,3)

=lorem(7)

=lorem(7,3)

The function can take one or two parameters. When only one parameter is given, that is the number of paragraphs of three sentences. When two parameters are given, the first is the number of paragraphs and the second is the number of sentences in each paragraph.

In Word 2000-2003, the text used by rand is the sentence: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. You can get this in ribbon versions of word using the function "rand.old" instead of "rand."

In ribbon versions of Word the text used by rand appears to come from Word's help files.

The lorem function works with the same parameters but produced nonsense text that looks like Latin and is adapted from text written by Cicero. See Lorem Ipsum. It looks much more like ordinary text (at least in English or Latin). Sentence length varies and there is a normal distribution of ascenders and descenders in the letters. This use as dummy text dates back to the middle ages.

For more on this AutoCorrect function, see The Rand "Virus" or how to insert dummy text into a document.

You can download a free Add-In for Word 2007-2013 that writes these formulae for you to help you learn them. It has a custom dialog box that gives you choices.

Where Are AutoCorrect Entries Stored?

Unformatted AutoCorrect entries are stored in .acl files. These files are language-specific. That is, if you change the language setting for your text, a different .acl file will be used (or generated).

Formatted AutoCorrect entries are stored in normal.dot / normal.dotm.

See also What Files Do I Need to Back Up?
 

Moving or Copying AutoCorrect Entries

USE THE AUTOCORRECT UTILITY FROM THE MVP SITE

This utility supplants and improves the utility from Microsoft. It copies your AutoCorrect Entries into a Word table.  They can be viewed and edited in that table. Then the utility can put your edits into your AutoCorrect all at once. You can also copy the table to a different computer and use the utility to copy your AutoText onto that computer. Easy to use. Free! The version of this utility for Word 2007 - 2013 can be found on Jay Freedman's site.
 

(The following is from the Chapter on Numbering:)

Use AutoText to Create Sequence Fields for Interrogatories and More

A Sequence field tracks differently numbered lists within a document. Combining Sequence fields and AutoText entries give you a fast and easy way to insert Interrogatories, Requests for Production, and Requests for Admission.

Practice: Use Sequence Fields

  1. Type INTERROGATORY NO. followed by a space.
  2. Press CTRL+F9 to insert field characters.
  3. Type SEQ Rog within the field characters.

 
Note Note  The "Rog" in this example is the name of the Interrogatory numbering scheme. This name will keep this numbering scheme unique from any other schemes that may be running in the document. See Tip below for more information.

  1. Press F9 to update the field. A number "1" should appear.
  2. Select INTERROGATORY NO. 1, and press ALT+F3 to create a new AutoText entry.
  3. Type rog for the AutoText entry name, and click OK.
  4. Type Request for ANSWER followed by a space.
  5. Press CTRL+F9 to insert field characters.
  6. Type SEQ Ans within the field characters.
  7. Select ANSWER 1, and press ALT+F3 to create a new AutoText entry.
  8. Type Ans for the AutoText entry name, and click OK.
  9. Type Ans and press F3. The next sequential number for an Answer appears.
  10. Press ENTER and type rog and press F3. The next sequential Interrogatory appears.

To use the AutoText entry, simply type rog and press F3.

 
Tip Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

 

How to Print AutoText Entries

You can print all AutoText entries (in the attached template and any global templates) using:

File > Print

In the print dialog box toward the lower left you will see "Print what" answered with "Document." Change that to "AutoText entries." Click on OK.

To Print AutoCorrect Entries

Use the AutoCorrect backup utility you can download from the MVP FAQ site to create a table with your AutoCorrect entries. Print that table.

Turning AutoFormat as You Type Options Off

Many of the AutoFormat as You Type Options cause unexpected changes in your document. While there are times when they are useful, those times are not frequent for your author. Here are screenshots showing the ones that I uncheck, and those that I leave on. These are from Word 2003 and Word 2010.

Word 2003 Options AutoFormat As You Type  AutoFormat As You Type Options - Word 2010

See Tame AutoFormat and How To Turn Off AutoFormat Options.

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting AutoText

Weird formatting?

No tooltip is showing for my AutoText so I can't press Enter and insert it.

In Word 2010 this indicates that your AutoText is stored somewhere other than normal.dotm. This is perfectly acceptable but you can't use the Enter key or see the tooltip. Once you have typed at least four letters of the name, try pressing the F3 key to insert your AutoText. Long term, you can use the organizer to insert it.

In Word 2007 no tooltips show for AutoText entries. Period. You can still use the F3 key to enter AT entries in your text.

In Word 97-2003 this may indicate multiple AutoText entries with the same entry name or that you haven't typed enough of the name for Word to distinguish the entry you want from a different one with the same beginning to the name.

Missing Page Number / Header / Footer Commands - greyed out - Charles Kenyon

Troubleshooting AutoCorrect

If AutoCorrect does something you don't like, immediately press Ctrl+Z to UnDo it. You can edit the AutoCorrect Options to remove entries that consistently cause you problems.

Every Word user should have one of two key AutoCorrect Backup/Restore utilities. The one for Word 97-2003 can be found on the MVP site. The one for later (ribbon) versions (AutoCorrect2007.zip) can be found on Jay Freedman's site. These create a backup Word document that has all of the AutoCorrect entries in a given language in a table. This makes it easy to move entries to a new computer or make changes. Note the utility does not delete AutoCorrect entries that exist. If there is one with the same name, it will replace it.

On one of the Word help forums the question arose on how to deal with multiple AutoCorrect entries that were causing problems. Specifically, the user had AutoCorrects to change the "ise" endings on words to "ize." That is, it would automatically change "customize" to "customise" and so forth. It is likely that this happened from using the spell check option to add spelling errors to AutoCorrect (below). These are not built into Word.

Over time, having this checked is likely to result in a number of entries that are problematic. Going through the list in AutoCorrect Options would be hit-or-miss. The Backup/Restore utility could be used, though, to search the backup document for these entries so that they could later be changed using the AutoCorrect Options. It would also be possible, using that utility, to restore an AutoCorrect without the problem entries. Doing so would require that they be unformatted entries (not stored in the normal template). You could then rename the ACL file with Word closed so Word would not use it. Using the Backup utility would restore all of the other entries without the ones that were deleted.

I would be tempted, though, to simply rename the ACL file and start over from scratch, perhaps looking through the backup file to see if it contains anything very useful.

Troubleshooting AutoFormat as You Type

If AutoFormat as You Type causes you problems, immediately press Ctrl+Z to undo the change it made. Then go into the AutoCorrect Options to turn off the feature that is causing you problems. You can see at I keep most of the options off on my computer. Remember that there are two tabs for AutoFormat in the options. You want to make your changes to "Autoformat as You Type."

Turn it off!

Style changes can seem like they must be AutoFormat gone whacky! The following is from the Chapter on Styles:

A style has changed unexpectedly

Check to see if automatic updating is turned on for the style. With automatic updating, a style is updated automatically when you make additional changes to the style, meaning that every paragraph in your document assigned to that style will change automatically. To turn off this feature, click the Format menu, and choose Style. Select the style in the Styles box, and then click Modify. If the Automatically update check box is selected, clear it.

Your style may have been based on another style that has changed. Changes to a base style affect other styles in the document that are based on it. For example, if you change the font in Normal to the Arial font, Word changes the font for the styles used in footnotes, headers, footers, page numbers, and other text. If you don't want a certain style to change when you change the base style, make certain your style is not based on another style. On the Format menu, click Style. In the Styles box, click the style you want to modify, click Modify, and then click (no style) in the Based on box.
Warning Warning  When you base a style on No Style, you will need to set the Language because the default will be No Proofing. (Word 97)

Charles Kenyon note: I recommend that you not base any styles on normal and that you change the built-in styles so that they are not based on normal. This is particularly true for any styles that are involved in paragraph numbering.


If you change the styles in a template and then reopen a document based on that template, styles in the current document may be updated, based on their definitions in the template. If you don't want the styles in documents based on a particular template to update when you open the documents, click Templates and Add-Ins on the Tools menu, and then clear the Automatically update document styles check box.

Charles Kenyon note: I recommend that you keep the Automatically update styles check box unchecked. Especially if you will be sharing your documents with others, leaving it checked can result in truly bizarre formatting and make your documents ugly or even unusable.

If the template that contains the style definitions is missing or damaged, styles in the current document use the style definitions from the Normal template.

Applying a style turns off bold, italic, or underlining

Sometimes when you apply a style that has specific formatting attributes to text already formatted this way, the reverse formatting may occur. For example, when you apply a style that contains bold formatting to a paragraph that contains some bold text, the bold text may lose its bold formatting. This problem will not occur if you apply character formatting— either through a character style or direct formatting — after you apply a paragraph style. Apply the style first, and then select the words to have other formatting and apply the formatting directly.
Tip Tip  To make sure that no direct formatting has been applied to the text, first select the text completely and then press CTRL+SPACEBAR. This removes manually applied formatting. Now when a style is applied, there is no reversing situation to occur.

Following is from Knowledge Base:

Article http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q170/7/26.ASP 

WD97: Macros to Test for an Existing AutoText Entry Name

Article: http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q176/6/92.ASP 

WD: Creating Custom Date Formats with AutoText and/or Toolbar


Hit Counter since 14 April 2004

 

 

Microsoft Word Manual Users GuideCopyright 2000, Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright 2000-2002, 2004-2006, 2010-2014 Charles Kyle Kenyon
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