Numbering
Home Up Numbering Track Changes Outlining

Table of Contents Introduction Word 2002 Web Resources Word Books Confidentiality Supplement Word FAQ Vendors Dir. Downloads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


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Click for information on Amazon.com about this book.

other books
about using Word

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

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Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
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Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
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Tutorials
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Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.


Click here for more information about the book at Amazon.com.

Click for information on Amazon.com about this book.

other books
about using Word

 

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

Users Guide
Tutorials

Basic Formatting

Complex Documents
Tables of Contents
Tables of Authorities
Cross-References

Confidentiality
and MetaData

Numbering

Sections and
Section Breaks

Headers and Footers

Styles

Boilerplate
Building Blocks
Autotext and Autocorrect

Tables

Track Changes
& Compare
Documents /

Merge Documents

Template Basics
Normal.dot

Troubleshooting

Document
Corruption

Third Party
Vendors
Directory

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

Use Google to
Search the
Usersguide to
Microsoft Word

 

 

 

 

Other Word
Links

Frequently
Asked
Questions

Books
about
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word
Free
Downloads
:
Add-Ins
Tutorials
Templates

Links

 

Flying Pillcrow - trademark of Madison Wisconsin Criminal Defense Lawyer Charles Kenyon'n Word sites - symbolizing the wish to make Word fly!

 

 

This site maintained
as a hobby
as part of my
 criminal defense
attorney web site
 in
 Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

 

Basic Formatting Styles Headers/Footers Sections Complex Documents Mail Merge Tables Template Basics Troubleshooting
Numbering Track Changes Outlining

Automatic Numbering in Microsoft Word

What You Will Learn

After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
bulletUse Automatic Lists
bulletApply and Remove Numbers
bulletContinue Numbering from a Previous List
bulletCustomize a Numbering Scheme
bulletApply Outline (Multi-Level) Numbering
bulletCustomize Outline Number Formats
bulletShare Customizations to Number Formats
bulletCombine Numbering with Styles
bulletUse Sequence Fields for Pleadings or to Produce Tickets
bulletCreate odd-number sequences or even-number sequences
bulletTroubleshoot Problems with Numbering and Apply Common Legal Numbering Customizations

Other Chapters Related to Topics Covered in this Lesson
bulletStyles
bullet(Advanced) Template Basics in Microsoft Word
bulletTroubleshooting
Additional Written (and Web) Resources
bullet Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
bullet OutlineNumbering by Shauna Kelly, MVP (This is sort of a Cliff Notes edition of John McGhie's article with lots of graphics and examples.)
bullet How to Control Bullets in Microsoft Word by Shauna Kelly, MVP. Bullets and numbering are very much related in Word.
bulletMicrosoft Knowledge Base Article — General Information About Bullets and Numbering — http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q159/9/43.asp http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q212/3/76.ASP
bulletWord for Law Firms by Payne Consulting Group:
bulletWord 97 for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bulletWord 2000 for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bulletWord X (2002) for Law Firms (also at Amazon.com UK)
bullet How to number headings and figures in Appendices by Shawna Kelly
bullet How to Remove Manually-Typed Numbering from a Document (VBA solution on MVP website)
bullet Numbering FAQ on MVP Website.
bullet Methods for Restarting List Numbering by Margaret Aldis
bullet Create a numbered list using SEQuence fields by Dave Rado, MVP, et al.
bullet Reverse-numbered lists by Greg Maxey, MVP
bullet Numbering Conundrums and variations by Cindy Meister, MVP
bullet How to find out the number, or list level, or outline level, that is applied to a list-numbered paragraphs, using VBA
bullet How to Number Headings and Figures in Appendices by Shauna Kelly, MVP
bullet Automatic Numbering in Word by Bob Blacksberg in Woody's Office Watch
More on Paragraph NumberingWord Automatic Numbering (continued), More Word Numbering, Restarting AutoNumber Sequences, More Numbering Intricacies,
bulletMousetraining's Intro Guide to Word 2007 found on their site
bulletMousetraining's Advanced Guide to Word 2007 found on their site
bullet How to have more than nine levels for outline numbering - not easy!
bullet Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP
Numbering Macro Packages
bulletNumbering Assistant by Payne Consulting Group at http://www.payneconsulting.com/Legal/legalnumbering.htm.
bulletThe Legal MacPac Numbering System by MacPac at http://www.legalmacpac.com/Numbering/Numbhome.htm
bulletSoftWise Consulting Services, Inc.
bulletTechLaw

Page Numbering is not covered in this chapter (CK note)

bulletPage numbering - see Basic Formatting 
bulletSee also: Page X of Y doesn't Work!
bulletSee also How to Control Page Numbering in Word Documents by Bill Coan, MVP.

This page last edited by Charles Kenyon on Monday 12 May 2014

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Numbering Overview

Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.

CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!

 
Tip Tip  Microsoft strongly recommends that you link your numbering to styles. The importance of this will be very apparent during the Outline Numbered section. Also, there is more information on the importance of styles when working with numbering in the Styles chapter. 

CK Note: I strongly recommend reading the following article. It may save your sanity (or at least your job). See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie. Somewhat easier reading and still very useful are Shauna Kelly's articles (see above) on outline numbering and bullets.

This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.


Automatic Numbered Lists

One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.

 
Note Note  Word does not convert typing to an automatic numbered list if the AutoFormat option is not activated. From the Tools menu, choose AutoCorrect. Select the AutoFormat As You Type tab, and check the option for Automatic numbered lists.

Practice: Apply Automatic Numbers
  1. Create a new blank document.
  2. Type the number 1 on the first line, followed by a period, and then press the SPACEBAR or the TAB key.
  3. Type some text and press ENTER. Word converts the manually typed number into an auto number and adds the next sequential number to the beginning of your new paragraph.
  4. Press BACKSPACE to remove the automatic number.

If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.

Unintentional Results with Automatic Numbering

Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.

Practice: Unintentionally Apply Automatic Numbers
  1. On a blank line, type A. George Smith.
  2. Press ENTER. The name A. George Smith is converted to an automatic number and the next sequential number (B) is placed on the next line.
  3. From the Edit menu, choose Undo (or CTRL+Z). This will undo the automatic numbering formatting.
Simple Numbered Lists

If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.

Applying Basic Number Format

The fastest way to get numbers into your document is to click the Numbering button on the Formatting toolbar. This button gives you either Word's default numbering scheme in your document (1, 2, 3) or the last numbering scheme used during this session of Word. Word's default numbers are Arabic numerals followed by a period.

You can also apply numbers by using a menu command. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering. There are different advantages to both. The following exercises show how to use each method to applying basic numbers to a list.

Practice: Use the Numbering Toolbar Button
  1. Click the Numbering button on the Formatting toolbar. An automatic number appears.
  2. Type some text and press ENTER.
  3. Type several additional items pressing ENTER after each item. You now have a numbered list in your document.
  4. Press ENTER twice to turn off numbering.
  5. Click the Numbering button to continue with the next sequential number in the list.
  6. Select the list that you just typed.
  7. Click the Numbering button to turn off numbering.
  8. Click the Numbering button again to turn numbering back on. The Numbering toolbar button acts as a toggle.
  9. Turn off Numbering and leave the document open for the next exercise.

If you need more numbering options, you can use a menu command to choose different number formats such as A, B, C.

Bullets and Numbering dialog with the Numbered tab selected

The numbered tab contains seven default gallery positions for numbers, each of which can be customized.

Practice: Use the Menu Command To Apply Basic Numbering
  1. Select the list from the previous exercise. It should contain items without numbers applied.
  2. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering, and select the Numbered tab.
  3. Select the number format that you want and click OK.
  4. Close the document without saving.
Turning Off Numbering

You may want to start and stop numbering while you are creating your list. The numbering button acts as a toggle, which means it is used to turn on and off the numbering. All you have to do is click inside the paragraph where you want to turn numbering on or off and click the Numbering button.

To stop Word from numbering additional paragraphs:
bulletWith the insertion point in the paragraph that you do not want numbered, click the Numbering button on the Formatting toolbar.
bulletPress ENTER twice at the end of a numbered list.

 
Warning Warning  Some people like to use BACKSPACE to remove numbering. This method does remove the number but leaves the cursor indented to whichever level you happened to be in, especially in Outline Numbered paragraphs. The two methods mentioned above will remove the number and restore your cursor to the left margin.

Continue the Numbered List

In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.

Practice: Continue from Previous List
  1. Create a new document.
  2. Click the Numbering button.
  3. Type Send Fax and press ENTER.
  4. Type File Motion and press ENTER.
  5. Type Call Opposing Counsel and press ENTER. Now you'll add text without numbers.
  6. Click the Numbering button to turn off numbers.
  7. Type John Smith 555-1234 and press ENTER.
  8. Type In the office from 12-3pm and press ENTER. You are now ready to add more numbered items to the document.
  9. Click the Numbering button to turn on numbering. Note that Word restarts your numbering back to "1".
  10. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering. The Format Numbering dialog box displays.
  11. Choose Continue previous list (at the bottom of the dialog box).
  12. Click OK. Your number should change from a "1" to a "4".
Restart Numbering

You can use the same technique to restart a numbered list back at the first number as you did to continue with the previous list. In the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, choose Restart numbering, and then click OK.

Lining Up Non-Numbered Text With a Line Break

If you want to add more lines of text under the first line of a numbered paragraph and you would like to line the text up, one solution is to insert a line break. A line break gives you a new line without a new paragraph. In WordPerfect, this is called a soft return. To get a line break, press SHIFT+ENTER.

Practice: Insert a Line Break After a Numbered List
  1. In a new document, click the Numbering button on the Formatting toolbar.
  2. Type Judge and press ENTER.
  3. Type Jury and press ENTER.
  4. Click the mouse after the word Judge.
  5. Press SHIFT+ENTER. The new line of text is aligned under the text but without a number.
Customizing Numbering

When you choose a numbering format or use Word's default, it not only provides you with numbering settings (1,2,3 or A,B,C, etc), you also receive other formatting as well such as indents and tabs. In order to satisfy different user's styles of numbering, you may need to customize the list accordingly.

Customized Numbered List dialog

Word provides numerous formatting options for numbered lists.

 
Note Note  Most of the formatting to numbered lists needs to be done from within the Bullets & Numbering dialog box. Otherwise, any change you make will only apply to the one paragraph instead of the entire list. The following table describes each of the items in the Customize dialog box and the function of each feature.

Field Option Description
Number Format Allows you to add text and punctuation to your number. For example, you can add parenthesis around the number or add a period. Even add the word INTERROGATORY if you want.
Number Style Choose number formats such as 1, 2, 3 or I, II, III.
Start At Determines what value the list should start at. For example, this document may be an addendum to another document and should start numbering at 25.
Number Position This affects how numbers line up in a document, whether they are right, left, or center aligned. For example, you may want decimals to align for lists with double-digit numbering and thus would choose Right alignment. Settings in this area do not affect the text however.
Aligned At This setting defines how far from the left margin the number should be aligned. This is similar to First Line Indent formatting.
Text Position This setting is where you specify where you want the text on all subsequent lines to align (using the left margin). This feature is similar to a Hanging Indent.

Practice: Change Indents
  1. Create a new document.
  2. Type =RAND() and press ENTER to put three paragraphs of random text into the document.
  3. Select all of the text. To do this quickly, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+A.
  4. Click the Numbering button. Notice that the number appears at the margin and the text is aligned at 0.25 inches.

 
Note Note  Make sure that your cursor is positioned within at least one numbered paragraph. It is not necessary to have all paragraphs selected for the next step.

  1. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering. The Bullets and Numbering dialog box displays.
  2. Click Customize.
  3. In the Number position section, set Aligned at to 0.5. You can either type 0.5 or increase the number in the spin box by using the up arrow.
  4. Under Text position, type 0 in the Indent at section.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes made to your numbered list.

The number is now indented and the paragraph text wraps to the margin.

 
Note Note  When you customize a number scheme, Word replaces the original numbering scheme in the Numbered tab of the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. To return to Word's default numbering schemes, click Reset.

Outline (Multi Level) Numbering

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.

To select outline numbering without changing the formatting of the paragraph, make sure that you select an outline numbered list that is not linked to the Heading Styles feature. Microsoft strongly recommends using numbering that is linked to styles. For more information on using styles in Word, see the Styles chapter.

The seven schemes displayed are in a gallery with each numbering scheme occupying a gallery position.

Bullets and Numbering dialog with the Outlined Numbered tab selected

Word includes seven default outline-numbering styles.

Applying Outline Numbers

In Word 97, outline numbering will not apply automatically as you type. You apply outline numbering from the Format menu by choosing Bullets and Numbering and then selecting the Outline Numbered tab.

In Word 2000, when you begin a numbered list, it is an Outline Numbered list by default. Therefore, you do not need to go into the Bullets & Numbering command unless you plan on changing the default scheme.

If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.

Once outline numbers are applied to paragraphs, use the TAB key, or the Increase or Decrease Indent toolbar buttons to advance to different levels within the outline numbered style.

Practice: Apply Outline Numbers in Word 97
  1. Create a new document.
  2. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering.
  3. Select the Outline Numbered tab.
  4. Select an option from the top row of the seven gallery positions.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Type text and press ENTER. A new number should appear.
  7. To move to the next outline numbered level, press TAB.
  8. Type additional text and press ENTER. Word continues in the same level as the last item you typed.
  9. Press TAB again to move to level 3.
  10. Type more text and press ENTER.
  11. Press SHIFT+TAB to move to the previous level.

You can use the Increase and Decrease Indent buttons to move to different outline levels as well.

 
Note Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.

Practice: Apply Outline Numbers in Word 2000
  1. Create a new document.
  2. Click the Numbering button to start Outline numbering. Your first level number should appear.
  3. Type some text and press ENTER.
  4. To move to the next outline numbered level, press TAB.
  5. Type additional text and press ENTER. Word continues in the same level as the last item you typed.
  6. Press TAB again to move to level 3.
  7. Type more text and press ENTER.
  8. Press SHIFT+TAB to move to the previous level.

To choose a different numbering scheme, you will need to go into the Bullets & Numbering dialog box.

Unexpected Results With Applying Outline Numbers in Word 2000

Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.

Practice: View Bullets and Numbering Tab While Applying Outline Numbers
  1. Click in one of the numbered lines from the previous exercise.
  2. Alternate-click the single numbered item and choose Bullets and Numbering from the shortcut menu. The Numbered tab is selected.
  3. Click Cancel.
  4. Select the entire numbered list.
  5. Alternate-click the selected list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the shortcut menu. The Outline Numbered tab is selected.

To choose a different numbering scheme, you will need to go into the Bullets & Numbering dialog box.

Customize Outline Number Formats

You can use the Customize button to modify the outline numbered lists to your specifications. When you modify a list, it changes that placeholder's preset numbering format. This is how you save your customizations. You have seven presets and they are stored in the Registry key List Gallery Presets.

 
Tip Tip  You can always reset your numbering formats back to Word's defaults by clicking on the Reset button in the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. You will have to reset each numbering scheme individually.


Customized Outline Numbered List dialog

You are able to customize the numbering scheme at any time: before, during or after you apply it. You can customize all nine heading levels or only the levels you are planning to use. Some fields in the Customize dialog box are the same as the Numbered List Customize dialog box. The fields unique to Outline Numbers are:

 
Field Description
Level Select which level you want to customize before you make any customizations.
Previous Level Number Word will include the number from the previous level in the numbering scheme.
Font Click Font to make changes to the font formatting of the number.

Table 2 — Unique customization options to Outline Numbering.

 
Field Description
More (Less) This button toggles and either expands to show additional features in the dialog box, or contracts to show less options.
Link level to style Attach a formatting style to a specific level of a numbering scheme not only to apply numbers, but to format text as well.
Follow number with Specify whether a TAB, space or nothing should follow your number.
Legal style numbering This setting allows you to set up numbering formats that use Roman and Arabic numerals together in the same list. For example, ARTICLE III changes to ARTICLE 3.

Table 3 — Options available by clicking the More button.

CK Note: I strongly advise attaching your numbering levels to styles for all levels at one time. See the articles by John McGhie and Shauna Kelly listed above. McGhie's article explains the why of this, the Kelly Article gives step-by-step instructions.

Practice: Customize Outline Numbering
  1. Create a new document.
  2. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering.
  3. Select the Outline Numbered tab.
  4. Select the second option on the top row. The default is 1, 1.1, 1.1.1, etc.
  5. Click Customize. Level 1 should be selected. If not, select level 1 from the Level area. Figure 4 shows the Customize Outline Numbered List that is used to change number formatting, such as indents, tabs, and numbering styles.
  6. In the Number format field, type Article before the number that appears in the box.

 
Warning Warning  Do not delete the number that appears in the Number Format box. If you do so accidentally, select a number style from the Number Style drop-down list to put it back. If the Overtype feature is active, this will cause the number to be easily deleted.

  1. From the Number style list, select I, II, III.
  2. Select 2 from the Level list.
  3. Click More.
  4. Check the box next to Legal style numbering and I.1 will change to 1.1.
  5. Select 3 from the Level list.
  6. From the Number style drop-down list, select a, b, c.
  7. In the Number format field, add and remove the necessary text to have the format appear as (a).
  8. Customize any level that you'd like and click OK to apply the numbering within your document. Article I should appear within the document since you added the word article before level 1 through customization.
  9. Type Introduction on a new line and press ENTER.
  10. Press TAB to change to the next level in the outline.
  11. Type Definitions and press ENTER.
  12. Press TAB to move to the next level (a).
  13. Type Lessee and press ENTER.
  14. Type Lessor and press ENTER.
  15. Press SHIFT+TAB to move to the previous level (1.2).
  16. Type additional text and press ENTER.
  17. Press SHIFT+TAB to move to the previous level (Article II).
  18. Type additional text.
  19. Leave this document open for the next exercise.

Use Aligned At and Indent At to fix the indents if necessary.

 
Note Note  The number format 1.1, 1.1.1, etc. uses the Previous Level button to ensure that each level changes when the highest level is changed.

Tip Tip  Outlined Numbered Lists give you the option to use numbering and bullets in the same scheme. Select the particular level, and in the Number Style field, scroll down and choose one of the bullet choices for that level.

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Sharing Customizations

If you have created great numbering schemes and would like to share them with another person, it is not an easy task to copy your schemes to another machine as the schemes are registry settings and difficult for the typical user to get to. If you open a document with the scheme to be saved, it's easy to add and save the scheme for you to use.

Practice: Share a Numbering Scheme with Someone Else

Send the document that contains the numbering scheme to another person. If you have received a document and you want to save the numbering scheme to your computer, simply open the document.

  1. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering, and then select the appropriate numbering tab.
  2. Click Customize.
  3. Click Cancel.
  4. Click OK. This tricks Word into saving the numbering scheme into your computer registry.

The next time you go into the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, the saved scheme appears as an item on either the Numbered tab or the Outline Numbered tab.

 
Note Note  Don't try to understand the Registry. This is something that the typical user should not venture into, as inadvertent changes can cause serious problems with your computer.

Warning Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.

Warning Warning (CK Note) To share a numbering scheme with another person or have it work for you over a long period of time or on a different computer, your numbering must be combined with styles (as set forth below). Failure to do this can result in what has been called "spaghetti numbering" and corrupted documents. 

See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.

Combine Numbering With Styles

Outline Numbering becomes much more powerful when you attach styles to each level. Styles provide the text formatting while outline numbering provides the numbering format. Together, you can save yourself a great deal of time.

For example, you would like to have your first level of numbering to be Bold and Centered. In the previous section, you experienced that when you used Outline Numbering alone, you had to format each paragraph individually to be centered. When you use styles, the centering takes place automatically once you've defined the style to be centered.

Word comes with some default Outline Numbering schemes that already have Styles attached but that doesn't mean you are only limited to those styles or those schemes. For more information on styles, see the chapter on Styles.

Practice: Use Styles with Numbering
  1. Create a new document.
  2. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering, and then select the Outline Numbered tab.
  3. Notice the bottom row of schemes. Beside each level you should see "Heading1", "Heading 2", etc. These are numbering templates with Word styles already attached.

 
Note Note  If you do not see the Heading styles, you may need to reset the scheme. Select each scheme and click Reset to restore Word's defaults.

  1. Choose the first option in the bottom row.
  2. Click Customize. Notice in the Preview area, there is a style listed beside each level.
  3. Expand the Customize dialog box by clicking More.
  4. Customize any of the levels as you see fit.
  5. For each level, there is a "Link Level to Style" drop down list.

You can choose any style you would like to use from this list.

 
Note Note  You can only use a style once in each Numbering scheme.

  1. Click OK. The Article I paragraph number appears in your document, along with the formatting of Heading 1.
  2. Type some text beside the number and press ENTER.
  3. The new paragraph is formatted with Normal style in case you would like to type a non-numbered paragraph of text.
  4. Press CTRL+ALT+2 to put the second level of numbering into the document.

 
Tip Tip  You can use these shortcut keys, the numbering button or the Style dialog box in the Format menu to apply the correct numbering level. You can also apply numbering that is linked to heading styles by clicking the Style box drop-down arrow.

  1. Type more text and press ENTER. Notice the text formatting that applies along with the paragraph number.
  2. CTRL+ALT+1 will give you another Level 1 heading/number. Type more text and press ENTER.
  3. Continue until you have a variety of numbered paragraphs containing styles.
  4. Close the document. You do not need to save.

For information on changing the format of your text, see the Using Styles chapter.

 
Tip Tip  You can also use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW and ALT+SHIFT+RIGHT ARROW to promote and demote your outline levels, respectively. If these keyboard shortcuts don't work, try TAB and SHIFT+TAB.

Numbering Items Within A Paragraph

If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system).

Practice: Number Items Within a Paragraph
  1. Start a new blank document.
  2. Type Please include the following information with your application and press the SPACEBAR.
  3. Press ALT+CTRL+L to insert the ListNum field.
  4. To change the level of the ListNum field, select the number and press the TAB key. Continue to press TAB or SHIFT+TAB to increase or decrease the level of the field.

 
Note Note  If Tabs and Backspace Set Left Indent are turned off, press ALT+ SHIFT+Right arrow or ALT+SHIFT+Left arrow to change the level of the ListNum field.

  1. Press the SPACEBAR after the number and type passport. Press the SPACEBAR.
  2. Press ALT+CTRL+L to insert another ListNum field.
  3. Press the SPACEBAR after the number, type driver's license, and press the SPACEBAR.
  4. Press ALT+CTRL+L to insert another ListNum field.
  5. Press the SPACEBAR after the number and type law degree.
  6. Close the document. You do not need to save.

You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.

 
Note Note  For more information on ListNum fields, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles:

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q162/8/95.asp - How to Use the ListNum Field in Word.

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q165/4/71.asp - ListNum Changes Numbering Level When Heading Style Applied.


Tip Tip  If you would like to create a numbered list that is not attached to the current numbering scheme in your document, you can use the SEQ field to insert numbers. This is discussed near the end of this chapter.

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Common Legal Customizations
Note

CK NOTE: I have separated legal customizations from Troubleshooting because I think they are separate concepts. These were combined in the original chapter on numbering. Customizations explored are:
bulletCentering text under the number
bulletAdding formatting to text without affecting the paragraph number
bulletInclude plain text on the same line as a heading
bulletSequence fields (for Interrogatories and more)


As you can see, Word provides numerous options for formatting an outline numbered list. There are a few additional things that law firms typically want to do that are covered in this section.
Centering Text Under the Number

A very common numbering scheme involves the first level of the numbering scheme to be centered, with the text under it as shown in this example:

Article I.
Introduction

If you try to set up a numbering scheme to do this, you will notice that your number disappears when you press ENTER to type the text or the text may seem off-center. The following exercise walks you through centering text beneath a number.

Practice: Center Text Beneath a Number
  1. You should still have the document open from the last exercise.
  2. Position your cursor in the first paragraph (Article I. Introduction)
  3. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering.
  4. Select the Outline Numbered tab.
  5. The second option from the top row should be selected.
  6. Click Customize. Level 1 should be selected.
  7. Set the Number Position to be Left.

 
Warning Warning  Don't choose Center in this example, as only the number and not the paragraph will be centered. This is one of the reasons the heading looks off-center.

  1. The Aligned At position should be 0.
  2. The Indent At position should be 0.
  3. In the More section of the dialog box, choose Nothing under Follow Number With.
  4. Click OK. Your text will look a little odd now with Article I and Introduction not separated.
  5. Press the Center button to center the text.
  6. Click in front of the word "Introduction" and press SHIFT+ENTER. This will move the text to the next line without turning off or giving a new paragraph number.
  7. Follow Steps 12 and 13 on the Article II paragraph.
  8. Keep the document open for the next exercise.

Styles with numbering would prevent you from having to center each paragraph.

Add Formatting to Text without Affecting Paragraph Number

If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:

1.1  Definitions

when you expected it to look like this:

1.1  Definitions

This formatting must be done through the Customization dialog box of Bullets & Numbering.

 
Note Note  IMPORTANT WORD 2000 NOTE

In Word 2000, the underlining feature for outline numbered lists is turned off by default.


Practice: Remove Underline from the Paragraph Number
  1. Select paragraph 1.1 Definitions.
  2. Apply underline formatting by clicking the Underline toolbar button. Notice that the number also becomes formatted with the underline.
  3. From the Format menu, choose Bullets and Numbering.
  4. Select the Outline Numbered tab. The second option on the top row of the gallery positions should be selected.
  5. Click Customize.
  6. Select Level 2.
  7. Click Font. When the Format Font dialog box displays, everything is grayed out or unavailable.

 
Note Note  All of the controls in the dialog box are either blank or grayed out because by default, the font formatting of the number follows the font formatting of the text that comes after-unless you explicitly declare exceptions as in the next step.

  1. Select None from the Underline drop-down list. There is a big difference in leaving something blank and choosing None. Blank means that it will follow the formatting of the text. None ensures that the number will never be underlined regardless of text formatting.
  2. Click OK. The number is no longer underlined.

This formatting is changed on a level-by-level basis. You will need to customize each level of numbering that you want to use.

 
Tip Tip  Using the same logic for removing underlining from a number, you can make the paragraph number bold without having the text of the paragraph formatted as bold. In the Customize window of the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, choose the applicable level and click Font. Select Bold, and click OK twice.

Include Plain Text on Same Line As Heading

(And Only Have Heading Appear in the Table of Contents)

Word uses styles to create Tables of Contents. A common practice in law firms is to generate outline numbered styles that have bold or underlined heading text immediately followed by paragraph text on the same line. Because the paragraph is formatted with a style, Word tries to place the entire paragraph in the Table of Contents.

One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.

Practice: Format Heading for TOC and Non-TOC Text on Same Line
  1. Create a new blank document.
  2. Type Agreement and press the SPACEBAR.
  3. Format Agreement with Heading Style 1 (you can press ALT+CTRL+1).
  4. Press ENTER.
  5. Type This should not be included in the TOC.
  6. Make sure that you are viewing non-printing characters by clicking the Show/Hide button on the toolbar (the button with on it). You should see paragraph marks next to the word Agreement if you are viewing these characters.
  7. Select the paragraph mark that follows Agreement.
  8. From the Format menu, choose Font. Check the option for Hidden and click OK.
  9. Hide non-printing characters by clicking the Show/Hide button on the toolbar.

When the document is printed, it appears as though the heading text for the TOC and the plain text are on the same line.

 
Tip Tip  You may want to change the color of the Hidden Paragraph Mark to make it more visual to other users that edit the document.

CK Tip: You may even want to insert a comment to explain what is going on!

 

Sequence Fields for Numbering - CK Introductory Note

Sequence fields are the first method that Word developed for automatic numbering and, in the words of John McGhie, the most robust. They are virtually unbreakable. Here is a link to the Microsoft Office reference page for them in Word 2010. As far as I know, the syntax and the switches have remained unchanged since before Windows.


Create Sequence Fields for Interrogatories and More

A Sequence field tracks differently numbered lists within a document. Combining Sequence fields and AutoText entries give you a fast and easy way to insert Interrogatories, Requests for Production, and Requests for Admission.

Practice: Use Sequence Fields

  1. Type INTERROGATORY NO. followed by a space.
  2. Press CTRL+F9 to insert field characters.
  3. Type SEQ Rog within the field characters.

 
Note Note  The "Rog" in this example is the name of the Interrogatory numbering scheme. This name will keep this numbering scheme unique from any other schemes that may be running in the document. See Tip below for more information.

  1. Press F9 to update the field. A number "1" should appear.
  2. Select INTERROGATORY NO. 1, and press ALT+F3 to create a new AutoText entry.
  3. Type rog for the AutoText entry name, and click OK.
  4. Type Request for ANSWER followed by a space.
  5. Press CTRL+F9 to insert field characters.
  6. Type SEQ Ans within the field characters.
  7. Select ANSWER 1, and press ALT+F3 to create a new AutoText entry.
  8. Type Ans for the AutoText entry name, and click OK.
  9. Type Ans and press F3. The next sequential number for an Answer appears.
  10. Press ENTER and type rog and press F3. The next sequential Interrogatory appears.

To use the AutoText entry, simply type rog and press F3.

 
Tip Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

Use Sequence Fields for Tickets and More

A Sequence field tracks differently numbered lists within a document. Using different sequence fields can give you the ability to print a number of tickets on a page, make a stack of pages, cut the stack into tickets and have the tickets numbered sequentially.

Question:

I've been printing tickets that require sequential numbering and have that working but I have some issues that are bigger then my knowledge.

I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.

Any suggestions on the best way to split the 6 regions so that the top left region would be 1-335, then the middle top would be 336-670, Then the top right would be 671-1005, then bottom left would be 1006 - 1340, Then bottom middle would be 1341-1675, then the final bottom right region would be 1676-2010?

Answer: Use Sequence Fields

  1. Instead of a merge, use a page of labels with six SEQ fields set for different sequences and with an interval of 6. The first page would be your initial set of fields with numbering 1, 35, 69, 103, 137, and 171.
  2. The first field would be { SEQ Ticket1 /r 1 /# "0000" }.
  3. The second would be { SEQ Ticket2 /r 35 /# "0000" } and so forth.
Note Remember  the { } braces for fields cannot be typed. They must be inserted by Word.

In Word 2007 and later using Insert > QuickParts > Field or Ctrl+F9.   
In Word 97-2004 use Insert > Field or Ctrl+F9.

  1. Labels are Word Tables.
  2. Create your first page, what you are using for a merge page now. Use the six SEQ fields instead of the Mail Merge field.
  3. Copy the entire table on the first page and paste it creating a second page.
  4. On the second page press Alt+F9 to toggle display of field codes.
  5. Change the fields to drop the /r switch, i.e.
    The first field on the second page would be { SEQ Ticket1 /# "0000" }.
    The second would be { SEQ Ticket2 /# "0000" }
    and so forth.
  6. Press Alt+F9 again to toggle back to field results.
  7. Then copy that page and paste until you have a total of 34 pages of tickets.
  8. Press Ctrl+A to select the entire document and press F9 to update the fields.
    You should have 2004 tickets numbered so you can cut them in sequential stacks.
    That is, the top stack would be numbered 1-34, the second stack numbered 35-68, and so forth. After you cut them, you can put the first set on top of the second, on top of the third...
  9. For larger numbers, increase the interval between each sequence and use that number of pages. What I suggested is based on 34 pages of 6 so the interval is 34. For each additional page of 6 you would increase that interval between the starting numbers by one.

Note that Word uses SEQ fields when it inserts Captions.

Even- or Odd-numbered SEQ fields - skipping numbers - CK Note

The Sequence Field has no switch to change the interval between numbers. It is always the next integer from the last one unless you are restarting the numbering. So, if you want a sequence of odd (1, 3, 5, 7,...) or even (2, 4, 6, 8, ...) numbers, how can you generate it using the SEQ field?

The answer is to use a pair of fields with one having the \h switch to hide that field and thus skip the number.

For an odd-numbered sequence for the MySeq identifier you would use the following pair of fields:

{ SEQ MySeq }{ SEQ MySeq \h }

For an even-numbered sequence for the MySeq identifier you would use the following pair of fields:

{ SEQ MySeq \h }{ SEQ MySeq }

The fields in the each pair will only display one number, but will use up two numbers in the sequence.

This idea from posts by Peter Jamieson and Greg Maxey on the Microsoft Office Answers Forum.

 

Troubleshooting

 
Note

CK NOTE: Before attempting troubleshooting, read the article listed in the additional reading "Word's Numbering Explained." After you read that article, you may also want to look at the following links to some discussions on the Microsoft newsgroups on numbering.
bulletNightmare on ListNumbering Street
bulletThe Joy of Lists
bulletRelinking ListTemplates
bulletOutline numbering: restart doesn't restart
bulletFormat Doesn't "Hold"
bulletListNumbering Street Revisited
bulletSee especially post #3 here which contains Dave Rado's concise instructions for setting up heading numbering.

 

My changes to my List Number Style don't stick

The following screen shots are from Word 2010 but this applies to all versions of Word. (Here is the same question and answer using Word 2003 screen shots.) This is CK's response to a question on the Microsoft Answers site.

Question: Why does Word 2010 still indent lists in blank documents based on Normal.dotm, even though I've modified the lists and styles in the Normal.dotm file?
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)

So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!

Pleased with myself (always a fatal thing when the gods of computing are around), I fire up a blank document and press the numbered list button.

My heart sinks. It's indented at 0.63, hanging at 1.27cm, no tab stop. For crying out loud! Why does it work when I've got the actual Normal.dotm file open, but NOT when it generates a new document BASED on Normal.dotm?

What am I missing, folks?

Response: First, the best way to do numbering is by tying it to styles, in particular to the heading styles.
How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in Word 2007 and Word 2010
When you apply a list using the buttons, you are not applying a style.  If you drop down the styles list, does it show "List Number" as the style in use? On my computer it shows the same style I started with, i.e. Body Text.  When you apply a list number style directly, from the Styles list, do your changes to that style apply?

If not, the changes you are making may not be sticking because of an Add-In or other problem with saving changes to normal.dotm. As a short-term experiment, when you have normal.dotm open type a phrase on the page like:
Kilroy was here!
Save it. Create a new document. Is your phrase in the new document? If it is, reopen normal.dotm and remove it! If it is not, you have something blocking your saving of normal.dotm or you are opening the wrong normal.dotm.
Normal Template in Microsoft Word - How to Open

Here are some screen shots of the same text but with the insertion point (focus) in different spots. The first one is after simply pressing on the numbering button.

Note that the style remains "Body Text" even though a number has been applied. Note also the font and the indents in the ruler.

The second shot (below) has the insertion point in the second numbered paragraph, the one where the List Number style was applied.

list numbering microsoft word screenshot help
Even though it looks like I clicked on the numbering button at the top, I did not. I applied the list number style. That style has different indents and a different font. Those are the settings in the List Number Style.

Understanding Styles in Microsoft Word

Numbering in Microsoft Word is broken, sort of. It has been for many years. (It is actually better now than it has been.) By attaching it to Styles, you can tame it. This is not fair; it is not easy; but, it isn't rocket science and it can be done.

Otherwise, that button at the top is for quick lists in documents that are not likely to be edited and where you are OK with the defaults that Word picks for you.


No Tab Option Setting

You may notice that when you are customizing an outline numbered list, you do not have an option to set the value of the Tab that follows the number. You can only choose whether a tab, space, or nothing follows the number.

 
Warning Warning  You can change the tab or remove it individually in each paragraph. BUT, each time you make a customization to your numbering scheme, the .25" tab will reappear in all the paragraphs that are a part of the list. This behavior occurs whether the numbering is tied to styles or not.

 
Note Note  By default, Word follows the number with a tab that is set at 0.25" after the number. If you set your Indent Position to be larger than the Number Position, this will control the position of the tab after the number as well as the text that follows it. But if you want text to wrap back to the margin, the default 0.25" tab will appear.

However, using Styles with Numbering can make this a little less annoying. Once your document is complete, the last step should be to fix the tab and update the style. It will at least prevent you from having to change each paragraph individually.


See also Troubleshooting

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Original Chapter on Microsoft Website. CK Note: I have added a lot of links, references and some material to this chapter. I've done this without the benefit of an editor and you may prefer the original version.


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